020 8374 7300

  • Professional Pilates Instructors

    Professional Instructors
    View a brief biography of the team...

  • Timetable

    Timetable
    Group class schedule including level...

  • Pilates by the Green

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Who is Pilates for?

    Anyone wishing to improve their total fitness, posture and appearance but also:

    Chronic back pain sufferers
    Those recovering from injury
    R.S.I. sufferers
    Professional sportspersons
    Performers (actors, dancers, musicians...)
    First time exercisers or those who have had a break from exercise
    The elderly
    Those wishing to prevent/combat osteoporosis
    Woman who are pregnant or have recently given birth

    Because of the gentle and precise way in which exercises are performed, Pilates is now endorsed by many medical specialsts including physiotherapists, back specialists, osteopaths, GP’s and surgeons.

    The Pilates we teach is ideal for those with postural difficulties, but is equally suited to athletes looking to balance out the body to make it stronger internally, without causing injury.

    What training have the teachers had?

    The two main teachers are both trained through Body Control Pilates (www.bodycontrol.co.uk), which is recognised within the industry as producing an extremely high standard of teacher.

    The team of teachers are carefully assessed to ensure they have the necesssary knowledge, care and skill to look after you. The process includes an interview followed by formal assessment of skills. Prospective teachers have to show their ability in both a group class and private lesson.

    Should I do Pilates if I have a bad back?

    Back pain can be caused by many things, including injury, misalignment of the muscles, poor posture and hereditary traits.

    Pilates can help in many cases as it is concerned with activating the core postural muscles (strengthening the deep abdominal and spinal muscles) to bring your body back to it's correct ‘neutral’ alignment.

    Because of the gentle and precise way in which exercises are performed, Pilates is now endorsed by many medical specialsts including physiotherapists, back specialists, osteopaths, GP's and surgeons.

    Of course there are instances where Pilates is not advisable, but we will tell you this before you spend any money.

    Should I do Pilates if I have an injury?

    It depends on the injury.

    When you get injured the muscles that are affected should be rested whilst they are healing. However, lengthy injuries can weaken the muscles considerably. Pilates can help by ‘awakening’ muscles that should be working and learn to switch off over-active muscles which have had to work in place of those that are weaker.

    If you are injured or going through rehabilitation you should always consult your doctor or specialist before starting any new exercise programme. As a general rule we will only take on clients if they have been given permission by their doctor or specialist.

    Am I too old to do Pilates?

    Absolutely not!

    There is no age barrier to Pilates. We have clients ranging from mid-teens right up into the 80’s. In fact there is a famous Pilates quote “you are as young as your spine”, which highlights that age is an internal mechanism and not what appears on the outside.

    Many exercises are gentle and work from the inside so nobody should feel they are unable to participate.

    There are many variations to the standard versions, so our teachers can always find something appropriate that you can do.

    Also, historically, Pilates has proven effective in preventing and combating osteoporosis.

    How do I start?

    Initially you have to do an introductory course of 5 sessions. These are private sessions which are very important to ensure we get the correct balance of exercises suited to your body.

    This introductory course allows us to:

    Complete the necessary paperwork
    Evaluate your posture and the exercises which suit you best
    Teach you the basics of alignment, core stability and breathing
    Teach you about the Pilates machines
    Ensure that you exercise safely and within your own limits

    By the end of the introductory course you will have enough knowledge about the basics to join group classes (or you can continue with private sessions).

    Will I lose weight?

    Unfortunately not!

    If we could then Pilates would indeed be the panacea for many people’s problems.

    If you need to lose weight then you need to think about your diet (see a nutritionalist) and do cardiovascular exercise regularly.

    Pilates will define your muscle tone and lengthen the muscles to give to a longer and leaner look, but it won’t lose those extra pounds!

    How long will it be before I notice a difference?

    The million dollar question and unfortunately one for which a definitive answer cannot be given. There are so many factors to consider such as different body types, ages, genetic and hereditary make-up, past injuries, levels of fitness and stamina ensuring that no one person is the same as the other.

    Remember, some of the problems we deal with have developed over very many years and therefore take time to remedy.

    However, you will find out very soon after starting whether Pilates is effective for you.

    You should notice small changes within the first 10 lessons.

    Once the basics of activating your postural muscles becomes more natural, then the benefits become more apparent, and the learning of harder exercises becomes much easier.

    As a general guide after 30 lessons you should feel more flexible, have better posture and move more freely.

    Is this like Yoga?

    Yes and no!

    Pilates has some of it’s roots derived from yoga based methodologies, and so some of the movements can look similar.

    Yoga is focussed on strength of external, mobilising muscles and flexibility, and also has a spiritual element.

    Pilates is focussed on internal, postural muscles and has no spiritual element (although you will often feel relaxed and more open after a session!).

    The biggest difference is the breathing. Yogic breathing is into the stomach, whereas Pilates breathing is concentrated into the thoracic ribcage. This is crucial and the main reason why people practising yoga, often, initially struggle to get a handle on Pilates.

    What equipment/clothing do I need?

    The beauty of Pilates, and one of the reasons it is so popular, is that you don’t need any equipment (except maybe a mat if you want to practise at home).

    Of course, in the studio we have some state of the art equipment to challenge your body more, but we’ll also give you a broad range of exercises to practise at home too.

    What training have the teachers had?

    The two main teachers are both trained through Body Control Pilates (www.bodycontrol.co.uk), which is recognised within the industry as producing an extremely high standard of teacher.

    Any ‘visitor’ teacher is carefully assessed to ensure they have the necesssary knowledge, care and skill to look after you.

    In addition to this we also have access to trained physiotherapists, who are degree trained and undergo extensive in-house training.

    Why should I do Pilates as opposed to other exercise?

    Exercise is good for you and so the simple answer is that you shouldn’t have to give up any exercise that you are currently doing (unless it’s harmful to you).

    Pilates is a perfect partner to almost all activities because it works from the inside out, and should be viewed as an add-on to what you currently do to balance you out. Because it is a balancer, Pilates is now a central part to many sports training programmes, including football, tennis, cricket, rowing...